That IMF critique in full:


"It's with trepidation that one approaches any critique of the EU's oeuvre. Europe's previous works have shown little promise, betraying a stunted imagination, plodding rhetoric and a narrative structure so confused it can only have been drafted by some deranged committee.

The Lisbon Agenda, for example - a text that promised at least a ripping yarn with its Ludlumesque title - disappointed from the first, and eventually just fizzled out.

And successive volumes of the ongoing Cap Reform Saga have become only more weary and meagre on plot development with each tiresome chapter.

When asked, therefore, to review the EU's latest work, my heart not only sank - my kidney's also committed hara-kiri and my pancreas imploded with disanticipation.

"The Greek Bailout" was billed as unprecedented in scale and ambition, and a one-off opportunity to rescue a tattered reputation and to silence the critics once and for all. A 'Debt Slide Story' de nos jours.

Indeed the synopsis promises much, and the conceit - if you will - had the potential to be the basis for a veritable masterpiece.

Regretably, however, it seems that the authors would have fallen short of much more modest aims.

From the beginning to the end, the protagonists are bi-dimensional and monosyllabic.

A stultifying dialogue throughout belies an otherwise tragi-dramatic sub-plot that is entirely and incomprehensibly ignored, to the ultimate detriment of the work.

To add insult to injury, the notions are recherché, and the structures flawed, while too many questions are left unanswered. 

It all conspires to drag this sorry tale to a denouement that is frankly unsatisfactory to say the least.

We hear tell of a possible sequel. One can only hope, for the sake of our collective and individual well-being, that the amateurish architects of this latest flop can be discouraged.



Two stars (not recommended)"

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